Cafe Rua’s Award Winning Mayo version of a Scotch Egg

Here’s the recipe for our Mayo version of a Scotch Egg.

We feature it as a a special in New Antrim Street and it recently won best in Connacht in a competition entitled ‘Eggs for Anytime’ run by Bord Bia.

CAFÉ RUA KELLY’S SCOTCH EGG

Makes 4

Ingredients

– 6 eggs
– 400g sausage meat – Kelly’s breakfast sausages
– 130g Kelly’s black pudding, crumbled
– 2 tbsps chopped mixed herbs (chives, sage, parsley and thyme, rosemary are all good)
– 1 tbsp Dijon mustard
– splash of milk
– 100g flour
– 100g breadcrumbs
– vegetable oil, to cook
– 4 slices brown bread
– 50g mixed leaves

Method

1. Put four of the eggs into a saucepan, cover with cold water and bring to the boil. Turn down the heat and simmer for five minutes, then put straight into a large bowl of iced water for at least 10 minutes.

2. Put the meat, pudding, herbs, and mustard into a bowl – you’ll need to add very little seasoning, as the sausage meat will already contain salt. Mix well with your hands. Divide into four.

3. Carefully peel the eggs.

4. Beat the two raw eggs together in a bowl with a splash of milk. Put the flour in a second bowl and season it with salt and pepper, then tip the breadcrumbs into a third bowl. Arrange in an assembly line.

5. Lightly flour an egg, pat out some meat mix on a lightly floured board and carefully encase the egg in it. Repeat the process for all the eggs. Dip each meat-covered egg in flour, then egg wash, then breadcrumbs.

6. Fill a deep saucepan pan a third full of vegetable oil, and heat to 170°C (or when a crumb of bread sizzles and turns golden, but does not burn, when dropped in it). Keep the heat under the oil moderate throughout cooking, so the crumbs achieve nice dark golden colour, yet the meat is cooked thoroughly. Cook the eggs, a couple at a time, for eight minutes, until crisp and golden, then drain on kitchen paper before serving.

7. Serve with mixed leaves and some brown bread.

 
 

Wild Garlic Weekend April 5th-6th

Our annual homage to one of our favourite ingredients.

Ramsons, wood garlic, wild garlic; call it what you will, Allium ursinum is a forager’s delight and one of the best natural ingredients around at this time of year. It’s hard to pin down it’s exact season, but the plant is often to be found in abundance around damp woodlands from around mid March until the end of May.

Unlike the usual variety of garlic, the wild stuff is prized for it’s leaves rather than it’s bulb. It’s flowers are also edible, but are more often used raw in salads(or delicious if pickled!). It’s distinctive and herbaceous aroma is somewhere between a scallion and normal garlic, and this subtlety makes it incredibly versatile.

Be careful when foraging yourself – it looks a bit like the poisonous ‘Lily of the valley ‘ plant. For positively identifying wild garlic, a quick grind of the leaves between the fingers should reveal a garlic like smell .

Our Café menus will be also feature plenty of Garlic with delicious specials at our Friday night supper in New Antrim street (Book on 094 9023376) as well as dishes like Friendly Farmer Chicken Kievs, Andarl Pork with Wild Garlic stuffing, Fishcakes with poached eggs and wild Garlic hollandaise.

Our shop will also be stocking wild garlic flavoured breads, soups, pestos, tarts and mayo to take home .

At the end of the month – Tuesday April 30th – we’ll also be covering some recipes featuring Wild Garlic , and celebrating some other great seasonal ingredients such as Irish Sprouting Broccoli, Spring Cabbage, Rhubarb and Asparagus. The evening includes all notes, a light supper and a glass of wine and tickets are priced at €35. If you’d like to come, please call our delicatessen on 094 9286072.

Some things to do with Wild Garlic….

BLITZ some of the leaves in good olive oil a
And stir through mayonnaise

WILT the washed leaves in a pan as you would with spinach. Lovely with a poached egg on some sourdough toast

CHOP some of the leaves into pasta,
Mash or risotto for a great garlicky edge.

SHAPE the left over mash or rice into cakes, add some
Cheese, a few more chopped leaves , dust in flour and fry
in a pan.

Pesto
Blitz together about 50 g of lightly toasted pine nuts, grated Parmesan cheese until roughly chopped and then throw in a good handful of wild garlic leaves, and the zest of a lemon and blitz it up again.
Add about 100 ml of good quality extra virgin olive oil and season carefully to taste.

 
 

Boxty

Boxty causes rows.

There are wildly differing recipes throughout Ireland, and everyone seems to have an opinion on the matter of what qualifies as ‘authentic’ and ‘traditional’. Generally made using an unusual mix of cooked and raw potatoes, there is evidence to suggest that the idea may have originated in the west of Ireland, but the tradition is also strong in the northerly counties. In her excellent book, ‘Ireland’s Green larder’ author Margaret Hickey proposes that the idea of grating potatoes would have been an expedient perhaps turned to during famine times as an alternative to throwing away soft potatoes.

At Rua, we make our Boxty once a year, and always around St Patrick’s weekend. The recipe comes from Nuala, our head chef in our Spencer Street café, who has made it for over 10 years for both our café and for sale in our shop.

Nuala’s Boxty

Makes approximately 5 cakes.  A quarter of a cake is ample as part of a full breakfast.

RECIPE

– 2kg spuds
– a small onion, finely chopped
– chopped parsley,
– 2 eggs, lightly whisked
– seasoning

Method:

– Sweat diced onion in butter and when soft add chopped parsley, cool slightly;

– Peel and coarsely grate potatoes;

– When done, squeeze the excess water from them – an unused tea towel or J-cloth is good for this;

– Add cooled onion and parsley to grated spuds, add beaten eggs, seasoning and mix well.

– To cook, fry on hot pan with some butter and a little oil to prevent butter burning.

– Shape into thick pancake shape on pan, and use a spatula to carefully flip over to do same on other side until golden brown.

– Serve hot with butter or salt, or cut into pieces and serve as part of a full breakfast.

 
 

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